Our Heart is Showing

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The community rallies this weekend to help three families.

A house fire that left a family of six homeless, a horseback riding injury that required a woman to undergo two major back surgeries and a bone marrow transplant for a local three-year-old have the community of St. Maries working together to help raise money to help cover costs for the three families affected by the hardships.

Benefit for Massing Family Friday

A local family still seeks a place to live following a fire at their rental home.

Michael and Bobbie Jo Massing, who have four children lost most of their possession in a fire Sept. 6. The couple has also been looking for a permanent place to stay since the fire.

Mary Orr, a friend of the family, has planned a benefit in hopes of raising some cash to put them back into a house.

“They are homeless at this point. We just got them a room for a week at River Front Suites. But they literally have nowhere to go. Their biggest need right now is a place to stay. If anyone has anything let us know.”

There will be a benefit for the Massing family Friday night. Michael and Bobbie Jo - pictured with their four children KaseyJane, Devon, Payton and Rickyann - lost the majority of their possessions in a house fire earlier this month. They are also looking for a place to stay.

There will be a benefit for the Massing family Friday night. Michael and Bobbie Jo – pictured with their four children KaseyJane, Devon, Payton and Rickyann – lost the majority of their possessions in a house fire earlier this month. They are also looking for a place to stay.

The benefit is Friday, Sept. 30, at the St. Maries Assembly of God Church. Mrs. Orr’s husband Scott will be cooking a spaghetti dinner. The cost is $5 per person or $20 for a family of four. Dinner will be served beginning at 5 p.m.

“We will have a silent auction during the evening, which will close at 7 p.m. and then following that we will have a dessert auction,” Mrs. Orr said.

Mrs. Orr said local businesses and individuals have helped make the fundraiser possible. Potlatch donated a load of wood and North Idaho Drilling donated a load of rock.

“We have gift baskets, gift certificates, collectibles and various other items. Local businesses and individuals donated some pretty neat things,” she said. “The pasta was donated by Archie’s IGA, and the Fernwood Mercantile donated the meat.”

Mrs. Massing works at Valley Vista and her husband cares for the four children. Mr. Massing grew up in Emida, and his family still lives there.

Mrs. Orr said she is still seeking items for the auction and dessert items. Call her at 582-2085.

Back in the Saddle Again, October 1

A benefit is planned for St. Maries resident Peggy Manes Saturday, Oct. 1.

The “Back in the Saddle Again” Benefit will be at 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge. Mrs. Manes was injured in a horseback riding accident in July. She spent 10 days at Harborview Medical Center where she underwent two major surgeries to repair her badly broken back. The benefit will raise money to help the family pay medical bills associated with the surgeries and Mrs. Manes’ recovery.

A taco bar dinner will be served with Mexican rice and chocolate Texas sheet cake for dessert. The cost is $7 per plate or $25 for a family of four. An auction and raffle will follow the dinner at 6:30 p.m.

Prior to the evening event, Charlie Reynolds will be offering rides in his jet boat during the day. He will be at Spicer Pond at 9:30 a.m. Mr. Reynolds said people may call him for a time slot at 582-1206 or call Loretta Joines at 582-2319.

The pond is located just past Harvest Foods along State 3. Mr. Reynolds will take individuals out in his boat for a donation of $20 to $25, which will then be given to Mrs. Manes. Mr. Reynolds said he plans to offer rides until about 3 or 4 p.m., depending on if people continue to come.

Bryson gets help from his brother

A local family traveled to Seattle Tuesday for their three-year-old son Bryson to receive a bone marrow transplant.

To say the last few months have been difficult for Douglas and Erin Reid is an understatement. However, the support they’ve received from the community has been overwhelming.

The couple, who has four children, learned their youngest had aplastic anemia in August. Aplastic anemia is a rare disease where a person’s bone marrow stops making new red blood cells.

Ten-year-old Turstin Reid hugs his younger brother, Bryson. Bryson will receive a bone marrow transplant next month to help treat aplastic anemia, a rare disease that stops a person's bone marrow from making new red blood cells. Turstin will serve as the bone marrow donor for the operation, set for Oct. 14. Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

Ten-year-old Turstin Reid hugs his younger brother, Bryson.
Bryson will receive a bone marrow transplant next month to help treat aplastic anemia, a rare disease that stops a person’s bone marrow from making new red blood cells. Turstin will serve as the bone marrow donor for the operation, set for Oct. 14.
Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

In April 2016, Bryson started having major bruising all over his body, which led to petechiae on his face, Mrs. Reid said. Doctors discovered his platelet count was low and, so they rushed him to Sacred Heart.

“The bone marrow test showed that Bryson’s bone marrow was low.  So he was put on a high level of steroids to see if that would help his platelets increase. In the meantime the doctors decided that we needed to have our other three kids tested to see if anyone was a bone marrow match who could potentially be a donor if Bryson needed a bone marrow transplant,” Mrs. Reid said.

Three weeks later, doctors tested Bryson’s bone marrow again, and it showed to be increasing. They began to wean him off the steroids. However, Bryson’s counts began dropping again, and this time is was his white and red blood cells. Doctors tested his bone marrow again, and results show that his bone marrow had less than five percent in it. He was diagnosed with aplastic anemia Aug. 15.

“This meant that we needed a bone marrow transplant and since we had already tested the other three kids to see if one of them would be a match we had the relief to know that our oldest son, Turstin (10), was a full match for Bryson,” Mrs. Reid said.

During the time the couple heard the diagnosis, Bryson was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with pneumatosis intestinalis. He was released after two days only to be admitted again with a blood infection. Pneumatosis intestinalis is where the bowels have gas in their lining.

“The pneumatosis was so bad that we had a GI doctor, a pediatrics surgical doctor, and a doctor of rare disease visiting us every day on top of our normal hematology doctor.  The way to treat pneumatosis is by antibiotic and gut rest, which meant Bryson was no longer allowed to eat.  Within the next few days a picc line was placed in Bryson’s arm, which allowed him to receive 100 percent TPN (total parenteral nutrition) so he wasn’t feeling so hungry,” Mrs. Reid said.

Once released, Bryson and his family went to Seattle to learn how the transplant would work. A week ago, an x-ray revealed the pneumatosis was resolved.

With everything cleared up, the family is hopeful that following a series of tests and CT scans, Bryson will receive a bone marrow transplant around Oct. 14 if all goes well.

“By the time Bryson makes it to his one year after transplant we hope to be back to a somewhat normal life,” Mrs. Reid said.

She added Turstin is a hero. She said his recovery after doctors remove the bone marrow should be fast, and he should be back to normal in a few weeks.

To help the family with expenses, Wendy Lee and others have organized several raffles.

“So far we have collected so many items for baskets to raffle off. Halloween is their favorite holiday, so we are doing baskets for fall and Halloween,” she said. “We also have a dump truck load of firewood donated by Potlatch, four cords. There is an account set up at Banner Bank for Douglas and Erin Reid as well as a youcaring.com under Bryson’s Brigade. People have been so amazing going out on their own to raffle items like arrowheads by Kurtis and Becca Plante, Mary Jo Campbell, a donate your change, and I have an entire dining room table full of baskets and items to raffle off along with gift certificates and more.”

Tickets for the raffle baskets are $1 each or six for $5. Tickets for the wood are $10 each. Tickets are available from Wendy Lee, at St. Maries Family Medicine; Mary Jo Jackson at Hill-Of-Beans, Tami Bell or Bonnie Morris.

Austin Mueller is also raffling a knife. Find information at Mountain Man Steel’s Facebook page.

Mrs. Reid and her husband are extremely grateful for the outpouring of support. Both of them were born and raised in St. Maries and recently returned after Mr. Reid’s time in the Army.

The Reid family traveled to Seattle Tuesday for their three-year-old son Bryson to receive a bone marrow transplant, donated by his 10-year-old brother Turstin. To help the family with expenses, friends have organized raffles, started an account at Banner Bank and have created a fundraising page at youcaring.com under Bryson's Brigade. Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

The Reid family traveled to Seattle Tuesday for their three-year-old son Bryson to receive a bone marrow transplant, donated by his 10-year-old brother Turstin.
To help the family with expenses, friends have organized raffles, started an account at Banner Bank and have created a fundraising page at youcaring.com under Bryson’s Brigade.
Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

“This community has pulled together and we cannot express how grateful we are. We can feel all the prayer for Bryson and our family, and that is the true reason why we are able to make it through all of this,” she said. “People have done so much for us.”

For updates about Bryson and the family, as well as fundraisers, find their page on Facebook, Bryson’s Brigade.

 

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