Sep
28
0

Our Heart is Showing

The community rallies this weekend to help three families.

A house fire that left a family of six homeless, a horseback riding injury that required a woman to undergo two major back surgeries and a bone marrow transplant for a local three-year-old have the community of St. Maries working together to help raise money to help cover costs for the three families affected by the hardships.

Benefit for Massing Family Friday

A local family still seeks a place to live following a fire at their rental home.

Michael and Bobbie Jo Massing, who have four children lost most of their possession in a fire Sept. 6. The couple has also been looking for a permanent place to stay since the fire.

Mary Orr, a friend of the family, has planned a benefit in hopes of raising some cash to put them back into a house.

“They are homeless at this point. We just got them a room for a week at River Front Suites. But they literally have nowhere to go. Their biggest need right now is a place to stay. If anyone has anything let us know.”

There will be a benefit for the Massing family Friday night. Michael and Bobbie Jo - pictured with their four children KaseyJane, Devon, Payton and Rickyann - lost the majority of their possessions in a house fire earlier this month. They are also looking for a place to stay.

There will be a benefit for the Massing family Friday night. Michael and Bobbie Jo – pictured with their four children KaseyJane, Devon, Payton and Rickyann – lost the majority of their possessions in a house fire earlier this month. They are also looking for a place to stay.

The benefit is Friday, Sept. 30, at the St. Maries Assembly of God Church. Mrs. Orr’s husband Scott will be cooking a spaghetti dinner. The cost is $5 per person or $20 for a family of four. Dinner will be served beginning at 5 p.m.

“We will have a silent auction during the evening, which will close at 7 p.m. and then following that we will have a dessert auction,” Mrs. Orr said.

Mrs. Orr said local businesses and individuals have helped make the fundraiser possible. Potlatch donated a load of wood and North Idaho Drilling donated a load of rock.

“We have gift baskets, gift certificates, collectibles and various other items. Local businesses and individuals donated some pretty neat things,” she said. “The pasta was donated by Archie’s IGA, and the Fernwood Mercantile donated the meat.”

Mrs. Massing works at Valley Vista and her husband cares for the four children. Mr. Massing grew up in Emida, and his family still lives there.

Mrs. Orr said she is still seeking items for the auction and dessert items. Call her at 582-2085.

Back in the Saddle Again, October 1

A benefit is planned for St. Maries resident Peggy Manes Saturday, Oct. 1.

The “Back in the Saddle Again” Benefit will be at 5 p.m. at the Elks Lodge. Mrs. Manes was injured in a horseback riding accident in July. She spent 10 days at Harborview Medical Center where she underwent two major surgeries to repair her badly broken back. The benefit will raise money to help the family pay medical bills associated with the surgeries and Mrs. Manes’ recovery.

A taco bar dinner will be served with Mexican rice and chocolate Texas sheet cake for dessert. The cost is $7 per plate or $25 for a family of four. An auction and raffle will follow the dinner at 6:30 p.m.

Prior to the evening event, Charlie Reynolds will be offering rides in his jet boat during the day. He will be at Spicer Pond at 9:30 a.m. Mr. Reynolds said people may call him for a time slot at 582-1206 or call Loretta Joines at 582-2319.

The pond is located just past Harvest Foods along State 3. Mr. Reynolds will take individuals out in his boat for a donation of $20 to $25, which will then be given to Mrs. Manes. Mr. Reynolds said he plans to offer rides until about 3 or 4 p.m., depending on if people continue to come.

Bryson gets help from his brother

A local family traveled to Seattle Tuesday for their three-year-old son Bryson to receive a bone marrow transplant.

To say the last few months have been difficult for Douglas and Erin Reid is an understatement. However, the support they’ve received from the community has been overwhelming.

The couple, who has four children, learned their youngest had aplastic anemia in August. Aplastic anemia is a rare disease where a person’s bone marrow stops making new red blood cells.

Ten-year-old Turstin Reid hugs his younger brother, Bryson. Bryson will receive a bone marrow transplant next month to help treat aplastic anemia, a rare disease that stops a person's bone marrow from making new red blood cells. Turstin will serve as the bone marrow donor for the operation, set for Oct. 14. Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

Ten-year-old Turstin Reid hugs his younger brother, Bryson.
Bryson will receive a bone marrow transplant next month to help treat aplastic anemia, a rare disease that stops a person’s bone marrow from making new red blood cells. Turstin will serve as the bone marrow donor for the operation, set for Oct. 14.
Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

In April 2016, Bryson started having major bruising all over his body, which led to petechiae on his face, Mrs. Reid said. Doctors discovered his platelet count was low and, so they rushed him to Sacred Heart.

“The bone marrow test showed that Bryson’s bone marrow was low.  So he was put on a high level of steroids to see if that would help his platelets increase. In the meantime the doctors decided that we needed to have our other three kids tested to see if anyone was a bone marrow match who could potentially be a donor if Bryson needed a bone marrow transplant,” Mrs. Reid said.

Three weeks later, doctors tested Bryson’s bone marrow again, and it showed to be increasing. They began to wean him off the steroids. However, Bryson’s counts began dropping again, and this time is was his white and red blood cells. Doctors tested his bone marrow again, and results show that his bone marrow had less than five percent in it. He was diagnosed with aplastic anemia Aug. 15.

“This meant that we needed a bone marrow transplant and since we had already tested the other three kids to see if one of them would be a match we had the relief to know that our oldest son, Turstin (10), was a full match for Bryson,” Mrs. Reid said.

During the time the couple heard the diagnosis, Bryson was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with pneumatosis intestinalis. He was released after two days only to be admitted again with a blood infection. Pneumatosis intestinalis is where the bowels have gas in their lining.

“The pneumatosis was so bad that we had a GI doctor, a pediatrics surgical doctor, and a doctor of rare disease visiting us every day on top of our normal hematology doctor.  The way to treat pneumatosis is by antibiotic and gut rest, which meant Bryson was no longer allowed to eat.  Within the next few days a picc line was placed in Bryson’s arm, which allowed him to receive 100 percent TPN (total parenteral nutrition) so he wasn’t feeling so hungry,” Mrs. Reid said.

Once released, Bryson and his family went to Seattle to learn how the transplant would work. A week ago, an x-ray revealed the pneumatosis was resolved.

With everything cleared up, the family is hopeful that following a series of tests and CT scans, Bryson will receive a bone marrow transplant around Oct. 14 if all goes well.

“By the time Bryson makes it to his one year after transplant we hope to be back to a somewhat normal life,” Mrs. Reid said.

She added Turstin is a hero. She said his recovery after doctors remove the bone marrow should be fast, and he should be back to normal in a few weeks.

To help the family with expenses, Wendy Lee and others have organized several raffles.

“So far we have collected so many items for baskets to raffle off. Halloween is their favorite holiday, so we are doing baskets for fall and Halloween,” she said. “We also have a dump truck load of firewood donated by Potlatch, four cords. There is an account set up at Banner Bank for Douglas and Erin Reid as well as a youcaring.com under Bryson’s Brigade. People have been so amazing going out on their own to raffle items like arrowheads by Kurtis and Becca Plante, Mary Jo Campbell, a donate your change, and I have an entire dining room table full of baskets and items to raffle off along with gift certificates and more.”

Tickets for the raffle baskets are $1 each or six for $5. Tickets for the wood are $10 each. Tickets are available from Wendy Lee, at St. Maries Family Medicine; Mary Jo Jackson at Hill-Of-Beans, Tami Bell or Bonnie Morris.

Austin Mueller is also raffling a knife. Find information at Mountain Man Steel’s Facebook page.

Mrs. Reid and her husband are extremely grateful for the outpouring of support. Both of them were born and raised in St. Maries and recently returned after Mr. Reid’s time in the Army.

The Reid family traveled to Seattle Tuesday for their three-year-old son Bryson to receive a bone marrow transplant, donated by his 10-year-old brother Turstin. To help the family with expenses, friends have organized raffles, started an account at Banner Bank and have created a fundraising page at youcaring.com under Bryson's Brigade. Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

The Reid family traveled to Seattle Tuesday for their three-year-old son Bryson to receive a bone marrow transplant, donated by his 10-year-old brother Turstin.
To help the family with expenses, friends have organized raffles, started an account at Banner Bank and have created a fundraising page at youcaring.com under Bryson’s Brigade.
Photo courtesy of Stephanie Rogers with FlowerGirl Photography

“This community has pulled together and we cannot express how grateful we are. We can feel all the prayer for Bryson and our family, and that is the true reason why we are able to make it through all of this,” she said. “People have done so much for us.”

For updates about Bryson and the family, as well as fundraisers, find their page on Facebook, Bryson’s Brigade.

 

Sep
7
0

Scout improves playground

Vic Camm Park received a makeover as part of Dawson Marunde’s project to earn his Eagle Scout rank.

Dawson has been active in Boy Scouts for seven years. When it came time to select a project for his Eagle project, Vic Camm Park came to mind.

Dawson Marunde, left, stands in front of the new playset he installed at Vic Camm Park as part of his project to earn his Eagle rank for Boy Scouts.

Dawson Marunde, left, stands in front of the new playset he installed at Vic Camm Park as part of his project to earn his Eagle rank for Boy Scouts.

“I have a lot of younger siblings from ages two to 10, and so my family comes up here to play a lot,” he said. “I realized there were some safety hazards at the park and so came up with a plan to put in a new play set and build a fence.”

Though he was not able to put up a fence, Dawson did tear out old the play set and put in a new one. He also repainted the merry-go-round. In addition, he dug a trench around the merry-go-round and put in wood chips. Wood chips were also placed around the new play set as well.

“I had to ask family and friends and local residents for monetary support for the project and also had to find people, including those in my own troop, to help me build it,” he said.

Dawson said he was happy with how the project came together.

“I learned plans don’t always go like you think they will and you do hit bumps in the road and have to figure things out,” he said. “But I am happy with it, and I think everyone else is too. I want to thank everyone in the community who helped support this project and who came and helped me with the labor.”

Donations are still being accepted to help cover the cost of the new play set. Contact Dawson or his mom Katie Priddy at 582-0589 to make a contribution.

We are just days away from one of the biggest small-town celebrations around. Don’t miss any of the events we’ve crammed into four days, starting Friday when the carnival and community booths open for business. A variety of other events, including a fun run, junior olympics, a demolition derby, logging competitions and the best fireworks show around fill Labor Day weekend.

Friday, September 2
› ALL DAY Visit St. Maries and have some fun. Spend some time and take a trip up the St. Joe River its a beautiful drive. You can go swimming, fishing, or play a round of golf. Stop by the Hughes House on Main Avenue to learn more about our area’s past. Plan to shop St. Maries for great bargains during the sidewalk sales. The information booth is selling Paul Bunyan Day T-Shirts, Sweatshirts, Hoodies and other stuff for the weekend on a first come, first serve basis. The hours are 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Stop by and say “Hi” to all the volunteers and get your questions answered. Be sure to purchase your tickets for the Hospice Wood Raffle while at the information booth!
Camping available at AQUA PARK with permits only. Someone will be down there at Aqua Park to collect your money and give you a permit for camping.
› NOON Community Booths and Blue Ox Tavern. Visit the many interesting booths in City Park and, if you’re 21 or older, check out the “Biggest Topless Bar” in Idaho. ID is required regardless of age.
› 5:00PM Pet and Doll Parade. Kids dress up your favorite doll, stuffed animal, or living pet and yourself and join the parade. First, Second and Third place prizes! Plan to meet your parents at the Football field, City Park, where winners will be announced and all participants will receive a snack. Parade route will be from 7th and Main to 13th and Main. No parking on either side of Main Street from 8th through 10th. STRICTLY ENFORCED!
› 6 – 10PM Karaoke at the Community Amphitheatre in City Park.
› 8 – 10PM “Shirts ‘n Skins” Square Dance at the Fairgrounds.
Saturday, September 3
› 8AM Paul Bunyan Days Karen Ebert Memorial 5K Fun Run/ Walk registration. The 5K race has returned to the Paul Bunyan Days line-up. Pick up races packet at St. Maries High School gym parking lot and get ready for a 3.2 mile walk/run along the beautiful St. Joe River Road. Late registration accepted until race time.

Several runners and walkers participated in the annual Paul Bunyan Days/ Karen Ebert Memorial Fun Run and Walk Sept. 5. In this photo, runners lineup moments before the start of the race.

Several runners and walkers participated in the annual Paul Bunyan Days/ Karen Ebert Memorial Fun Run and Walk Sept. 5. In this photo, runners lineup moments before the start of the race.

Demolition Derby registration at the Benewah County Fairgrounds.
› 9AM Fun Run/Walk begins. The 5k race begins with a bang. Whether you’re an experienced runner, an avid walker or just wanting to get out for good walk, this is an event you won’t want to miss.
› 9:30AM Junior Olympics Registration. Free and Fun – All kids to age 12 welcome. Football Field, City Park.
› 10AM Helicopter Rides. Come on down and check out the prices. West end of City Park.
Blue Ox opens.
Junior Olympics. Come on down and cheer these kids on as they compete for awards to be presented in each age group.

Lance Hamblin and Jared Badgett dive for the finish line in the sack race during the Junior Olympics.

Lance Hamblin and Jared Badgett dive for the finish line in the sack race during the Junior Olympics.

› 11AM Register for Water Events at the City Pool. 13-17 years old, parents must be present for sign-up and competition.
› 11AM – NOON St. Maries Community Band and Choir at the Community Amphitheatre in City Park.
› ALL DAY Carnival, Food Booths, Blue Ox, and Shopping. The Merchant’s Sidewalk Sales continue and all the fun continues at City Park. Don’t miss it!
› NOON Water Events. Come join the fun. Be part of it or cheer on the others. Loggers water competition is old fashioned fun with Log Birling, Canoe Jousting, Tight Rope Walking, Ma & Pa Raft Race, and more. Please bring your own towel.
Register to participate – Amateurs only.
› 1PM Crash for Cash Demolition Derby at the Fairgrounds.
› 5 – 9PM Earl Wear and Haywire at the Community Amphitheatre.
› 6PM Weigh-in for the Tug of War. 1500 lbs maximum co-ed teams. Must have one female on the team. Come on down to the Football Field to sign up.
› 7PM Tug of War. Don’t miss the action as you watch groups compete. Co-Ed teams 1500 lb limit.
› 8PM – 12AM JamShack the Blue Ox.
› 9PM Rose’s Fireworks Show. Low aerial firework show – sneak peak to Sunday’s big show!
St. Joe V
alley Car Club Dance. Everyone 21 years or older is invited to the Cormana Building, City Park, to have some fun and dance the night away. Music provided by the King Pins. Tickets $5 at the door.
Sunday, September 4
› 7AM – 12:30PM Community Breakfast at the Eagles Lodge.
› ALL DAY Carnival, booths, Blue Ox. All the fun continues at City Park, don’t miss out!
› 10AM – 6PM Valley Peacemakers Quilt Show Annual quilt show sponsored by the Valley Piecemakers Quit & Craft Club will be at the Heyburn Elementary School gym 1404 Main Street just one block from City Park.
› 10AM Blue Ox opens.
Helicopter Rides. Come on down and check out the prices. West End of the City Park.
› 11AM – 3PM Music at the Community Amphitheatre in City Park.
› NOON Paul Punyan Auction. If you want a bargain, and like auctions you will love this one. Great items donated by local merchants. Also loads of logs were donated and will be auctioned. Come and get your number and participate. Football Field, City Park.
Registration for Children’s Pool Events. Ages 6-12. Parents must be present for sign-up and competition.
› 1PM Children’s Pool Events. Ages 6-12. Inner Tube races and Parent-child raft races. Parents must be present for sign-up and competition.
› 5 – 8PM Down South at the Community Amphitheatre.
› 6PM Joy Night Worship at First Baptist Church, on Second Street. Fireworks pre-show.
› 9PM Fireworks.
› 8PM – 12AM JamShack at the Blue Ox.
Monday, September 5
› 8 – 9:30AM Register for the Parade. Sign up at Ken’s Body Shop, west end of town. Registration accepted until 9:30 only!
Hurry to get a spot in line for the Parade.
› 10AM – 5PM Valley Peacemakers Quilt Show The quilt show is sponsored by the Valley Piecemakers Quilt & Craft Club will be at the Heyburn Elementary School gym, just one block from City Park.
› 10AM Here Comes the Parade!! Grab a folding chair and line up on Main Ave. Give a hearty welcome to all parade participants. No Parking on either side of Main Avenue from 7th through 11th. STRICTLY ENFORCED!
Helicopter Rides. Come on down and check out the prices. West End of City Park.
› NOON – CLOSE Carnival, Booths, Blue Ox. The fun continues until this evening. Last chance to have fun – grab some lunch, the food great!

Josh Harvey takes one last swing before the top half of his log breaks off.

Josh Harvey takes one last swing before the top half of his log breaks off.

› NOON Registration for Logging Events. Sign up at the Softball field in the City Park. Amateurs only.
Kids Events on main stage at City Park. 2-5 yrs. old.
› 1PM Logging Events. It’s show down time Come cheer these loggers and loggerettes on as they compete in various activities. Amateurs only.

It is an honor she did not seek out.

But many will tell you it is one she deserves.

Francie Walters hold a portrait of herself that was taken during the time she worked as a nurse. Mrs. Walters is beiong honored for the contributions she made at a ceremony Friday, Aug. 26. Tamarack Conference Room at Benewah Community Hospital will be renamed in her honor.

Francie Walters hold a portrait of herself that was taken during the time she worked as a nurse. Mrs. Walters is beiong honored for the contributions she made at a ceremony Friday, Aug. 26. Tamarack Conference Room at Benewah Community Hospital will be renamed in her honor.

The Tamarack Conference Room at Benewah Community Hospital will be dedicated and renamed for longtime nurse Frances “Francie” Walters. The event is from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, at the conference room.

The ceremony will include a short program and an open house format, allowing the community to gather and visit. Refreshments will be served. Ron Hodge and Dr. Rick Thurston, who have both worked with Mrs. Walters, will speak at the dedication.

The committee that installed the Walk Through History Exhibit had the idea to honor Mrs. Walters for the contributions she’s made to the local clinic and hospital, Robin Renaldo said.

Mrs. Walters said she was quite surprised when she learned about the event.

“I was very surprised and humbled by it,” she said. “It is a great honor. I appreciate the honor.”

By the time she was five years old, Mrs. Walters knew she wanted to be a nurse. After graduating from St. Maries High School in 1950, Mrs. Walters worked as an aide at the old Milwaukee Hospital and then as a teller at E.G. Yenor’s bank.

In 1954, Mrs. Walters went to study nursing at Sacred Heart School of Nursing in Spokane. She worked at Sacred Heart after she graduated, returning to Fernwood in 1960 after she married.

During her years as a wife and mother, Mrs. Walters worked at Fernwood’s monthly well-child clinics and served as UpRiver’s community nurse, though it was not a recognized position.

She eventually went on to work at St. Maries Family Medicine – retiring in 1998 after 25 years with the practice. During that time, she continued to serve as a nurse to the residents of Fernwood and Santa.

“I found the work very fulfilling,” Mrs. Walters said. “I met a lot of wonderful people, especially those I worked with. The work is a joy and a privilege.”

Dr. Thurston said he had the pleasure of having Mrs. Walters as his nurse for the six years he worked in the clinic.

“Francie has been a lifelong giver of herself to her community; both in St. Maries and in Fernwood,” Dr. Thurston said. “She truly cared for people. She had that heart that I think is missing in our world today. She had a caring spirit and it carried through in her actions and deeds.”

He said the recognition is well deserved.

“I think it’s important to recognize people who have been Good Samaritans and given themselves to the community. Someone the rest of us can admire and look up to and strive for that in our own lives,” he said.

Dr. Thurston said he was there when Mrs. Walters learned of the honor.

“She said, ‘Well, there’s people out there who have given more than I have,’” he said. “Her humbleness is always a quality that is admirable.”

Judy Bailey, who has known and worked with Mrs. Walters, brought the idea forward to name the conference room after Mrs. Walters.

“I felt it was time that we honored her,” Mrs. Bailey said. “I want her to realize how important she is and has been to this community.”

Mrs. Bailey said Mrs. Walters was also instrumental in getting the BetterCARE Foundation off the ground.

“Without her, the organization wouldn’t have taken off like it did. She was always the first to volunteer her ideas as well as the leg work. She did so much for the hospital and this dedication is a way for the hospital and the clinic to say thank you for all that she has done,” Mrs. Bailey said.

Mrs. Bailey added Mrs. Walters is very genuine person and well deserving of the honor.

“The thing that comes to mind when I think of Francie is whenever you talk to her face to face or on the phone she never fails to sign off with God bless you and she truly means it,” she said.

Mrs. Walters requests no gifts.

Steers, hogs, chickens, rabbits, sheep and other critters will make an appearance at the Benewah County Fair this week. The fair starts tomorrow, Thursday, Aug. 18, and continues through Sunday, Aug. 21.

Fairgoers are sure to find something that delights them as an array of projects – both indoor and outdoor – will be on display. Not to mention this year’s theme is Stars and Stripes and Fair Delights.

Sean and Brenna Elliott will exhibit their pigs this week at the Benewah County Fair. This is Brenna's first year showing pig; it is her brother's fifth year. Sean will also show his steer. They said they've enjoyed the projects from training to bathing. Both pigs gained weight well, they said.

Sean and Brenna Elliott will exhibit their pigs this week at the Benewah County Fair. This is Brenna’s first year showing pig; it is her brother’s fifth year. Sean will also show his steer. They said they’ve enjoyed the projects from training to bathing. Both pigs gained weight well, they said.

Many 4-H students will be showing animals throughout the week with the goal of selling their stock to the highest bidder Saturday, Aug. 20, at the Junior Show Market Animal Sale. A buyer’s appreciation breakfast will be served from 8 to 10 a.m. before the sale. The menu includes biscuits and gravy and will be served by the Junior Show committee and participants.

The sale itself starts at 10 a.m. This is a great time for anyone looking to put meat in their freezer to come out and support the 4-H participants.

“The whole community comes together to support these kids,” Nancy Malensky said.

There will be 16 steers up for sale, 72 hogs, four chickens, one rabbit, five goats and seven sheep.

“The steer numbers really increased this year,” she said. “We’ve moved them down to the Judd Building and rebuilt the lean-to and will be showing them down there.”

Several other improvements have also been made, she added, due to great support from members of the community.

“We put concrete down in both the sheep and goat barn and there is a new permanent structure outside the building to cover the picnic tables,” Mrs. Malensky said. “It’s amazing what we can accomplish thanks to the work of volunteers and donations.”

In addition to the livestock show and sale, there will be an array of indoor exhibits. From horticulture to baking, to photography to sewing, a variety of projects by both 4-H members and the community will be on display in the various buildings throughout the week. Additional contests are also planned.

Benewah County 4-H’s 6th Annual Pie Contest is Saturday, Aug. 20. Pies should be entered between 12:30 and 2 p.m. at the gazebo. Awards are announced at 3 p.m. and pies will then be auctioned off. There are three categories: fruit and berry, cream, and other. First, second and third place ribbons are awarded in each category as well as Best of Show.

Another type of pie will pick the winner of a $500 prize. Cow Patty Bingo is at 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 21. For $10, you can purchase a square on the grid for a chance to win. Proceeds benefit Benewah County 4-H. Tickets may be purchased at the fair.

The St. Maries Fire Department will do a fire safety demonstration in the arena at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. Also, Kiwanis will cook breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 21. Finally, throughout the week, for a small fee, the largest 4-H group, Dead Eye Archery, will give fairgoers a chance to try their hand at shooting a bow. Several fun targets are expected.

Buildings and exhibits will be open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday. Then, on Sunday, the fair will be open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

2016 Benewah County Fair Schedule

Thursday, August 18

7:30AM Junior Show Participants meet with judge

8 to 11AM Junior Show Swine Fitting and Showing

11:30AM Junior Show Final Round of Swine Fitting and Showing

Noon to 1PM Junior Show Market Lamp and Meat Goat Quality followed by open classes

1 to 3PM Poultry and Rabbit Fitting and Showing followed by quality judging in the pen

3 to 3:30PM PeeWee Swine Showing

4 to 6PM Junior Show Market Beef Fitting and Showing followed by Dairy and open classes

Friday, August 19

8 to 11AM Junior Show Swine Quality followed by open classes

11 to 11:30AM Lunch Break

11:30 to 12:15PM Junior Show Sheep Fitting and Showing

12:15 to 2:30PM Junior Show Goat Fitting and Showing. Junior Show Dairy Goat Quality, Pet Pack and Breeding followed by open classes

3 to 5:30PM Junior Show Bee Quality Judging

5:30 to 6PM Animal Dress Up Contest

6PM ADG Awards

6PM Community band performs

6:15 to 8:15PM Round Robin

Saturday, August 20

8 to 10AM Buyer’s Appreciation Breakfast

10AM Junior Show Market Animal Sale

10AM to 1PM Enter pies for Pie Contest

2PM Fire Department Safety Demonstration in the Arena

2PM Pie Judging Begins

3PM Pie Auction Begins

Sunday, August 21

7 to 11AM Kiwanis Breakfast

11AM Cow Patty Bingo

11:30AM Dick Frost the Magician

3 to 6PM All exhibits released

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